During the past five years I have painted representations of the human figure in order to depict aspects of modern life.

Several paintings deal with the influence of technology and the ubiquitous need to be ‘constantly connected‘. Others focus on the loss of privacy and the trade-off between safety and intrusion by the state, while some consider the ageing process, London’s property boom, social divisions, conflicting cultures, and the resurgence of extremism in Europe.

More recently, I have made several allegorical paintings depicting youth and the loss of innocence.

I mostly use my own photographs as source material together with digital editing to arrive at a composition, a process similar to making collages. However after painting, the end result rarely matches the initial digital image.

I like to think that my work forms part of a tradition whereby artists have attempted to express what it is to be human by concentrating on the figure. It is a tradition that has taken a serpentine path, and at times some have attempted to sever it, myself included. But the more I look at great art, and the older I get, the more I am convinced that figurative painting still has a fundamental role to play in the visual arts.